Tag Archives: AngelList

Crowdfunding Legal Resources

I really appreciate the time you spend on my blog. To make the blog more useful, I’ve added a Legal Links button, up there to the right. To start, you’ll find links to:

I plan to add more links in the future and welcome your suggestions.

Questions? Let me know.

Will The SEC’s 15 Day Notification Rule End Angel Fairs?

No, it won’t.

On July 10, 2013 the SEC proposed rules that would, among other things, require a company to notify the SEC at least 15 days before using any “general solicitation” to raise money under the newly-adopted Rule 506(c) of Regulation D, also known as Title II Crowdfunding.

This proposal triggered more anxiety in the investment community than any other. Angel groups in particular were concerned about the possible effect on “angel fairs” and similar networking events, where companies look for investors and publicity by making presentations and handing out literature. If these activities constituted general solicitation, so the thinking went, and a company had not notified the SEC at least 15 days in advance, the company would be violating the law with potentially serious consequences.

Should companies stop presenting at angel fairs? Should attendance at angel fairs be limited? Would the SEC rule bring a wrenching halt to the way startups have raised money for 30 years?

There are two reasons why the concerns in the investment community are probably overblown.

First, “general solicitation” is not a new concept. Regulation D has always prohibited general solicitation. Rule 506 of Regulation D is itself a regulatory implementation of section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, which provides simply that the registration requirements do not apply to “transactions by an issuer not involving any public offering.” It has always been the position of the SEC, reflected in Rule 502(c), that using general solicitation to attract investors crossed the indistinct line from “private offering” to “public offering.”

Thus, every angel fair that has ever been held for the last several decades has been subject to the SEC prohibition on general solicitation. Yet given all that time and all those opportunities, the SEC has never taken the position that what happens at angel fairs constitutes prohibited general solicitation.

Having stood aside and permitted angel fairs for three decades, it seems unlikely that the SEC would take the opposite position today, after Congress announces its support for Crowdfunding by enacting the JOBS Act!

So far, it is safe to say that the SEC has taken the opposite approach, i.e., by making Crowdfunding easier, not more difficult. Consider, for example, the two no-action letters issued by the SEC on March 26, 2013 to FundersClub and AngelList. It seems very possible, even likely, that these letters would not have been issued before enactment of the JOBS Act. The SEC seems to have taken the wishes of Congress to heart and there is no reason to believe it intended to do otherwise with the 15 day proposal.

The other reason the concerns are overblown is that the rule in question is not yet in effect. The public comment period ended on September 23, 2013 and the SEC is considering the many comments made by the investment community. The chances are very high that when the SEC issues the final rule, these comments will be taken into account.

Maybe I’ll be proven wrong. Maybe the SEC will suddenly reverse course after 30 years and issue final rules that blow angel fairs out of the water, throw up unnecessary impediments to Crowdfunding despite the JOBS Act, and make everyone angry. Don’t bet on it.

Questions? Contact Mark Roderick at Flaster/Greenberg PC.

SEC: FundersClub, AngelList Not Required To Register As Broker-Dealers

Through “no-action letters” dated March 26, 2013, the Securities and Exchange Commission has just ruled neither FundersClub nor AngelList, both nationally-recognized equity-based Crowdfunding portals, is required to register as a broker dealer under Federal securities law.

But portals are structured as investment advisory services and are registered as investment advisors. When a company is funded by investors, the portals do not receive cash compensation, as a broker would typically receive, but instead receive compensation more customary for a fund advisor: an interest in the future profits of the company – a “carried interest.” The form of the compensation seemed to be the principal factor that convinced the SEC to rule favorably.

Other equity-based portals might register as broker-dealers to avoid the issue altogether. Because both of these coordinated decisions could have gone the other way, however, the larger lesson may be that the SEC is taking a relatively hands-off approach to the rapidly-evolving Crowdfunding industry. If you are a portal or company waiting anxiously for the SEC regulations later this year, that is good news.

Questions? Contact Mark Roderick at Flaster/Greenberg PC.

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